• Reading Response Journal Homework

     

    1. Read for 15 - 20 minutes every night and update your Reading Log.

    You can choose what to read…

    • a fiction or nonfiction book (chapter or picture book)
    • kids’ magazine articles
    • books on myOn.com
    • Newsela.com (articles)
    • Tweentribune.com (junior) (articles)
    • Dogonews.com
    • Or any appropriate text

     

    1.  Complete any two reading response activities (fiction or nonfiction, depending on what you have read). These response choices are glued onto the back cover of the journal and are posted online on the teacher’s “Homeroom” google classroom.

    The responses should be written in the journal or completed digitally using google docs or google slides (if completed digitally, please print and glue into the journal, or if printing is not possible, “share” in google docs with the teacher.

     

    Be sure to write the number of the Fiction or Nonfiction Response choice, the title and author, and the date at the top of the page.

     

    Note:  The responses can be on different reading selections.



    Make sure your response….

    • Is NEAT and well organized.
    • Is written in complete sentences.  (Use the words in the question to start your answer.)
    • Answers all parts of the question
    • Is thoughtful and uses evidence / details from the story to support your answer.
    • Has correct Capitalization, Usage, Punctuation, and Spelling (CUPS)

     

    Reading Response Journals are due once a week.  

    Students will be assigned to a group:  Group A, Group B, or Group C.  

    The Reading Response Journals will be due based on the following schedule:

     

    Group A journals will be due to the teacher on Tuesdays and returned to the students on Wednesdays.

    Group B journals will be due to the teacher on Wednesdays and returned to the students on Thursdays.

    Group C journals will be due to the teacher on Thursday and returned to the students on Fridays.

     

    FICTION READING RESPONSE CHOICES:

    1. What did the character do, say, or think that surprised you?  Why?
    2. If you could meet the main character, what questions would you ask them?  Why?
    3. What do you predict will happen next in this story?  What information in the text helped you make that prediction?
    4. What is the main problem of the story?  Be specific in your explanation.  If you know, how was the problem solved?
    5. Write 3 important events that happened, 2 wondering questions you have, and 1 new title for the selection you read.
    6. Summarize what you read today.  What were the most important events?  Did you learn anything new about the characters?
    7. Choose 2 or more interesting, unfamiliar, or important words from the selection you read.  What do you think the word means?  What were the context clues that helped you understand the meaning of the word (remember: context clues can come before the sentence, within the sentence, and/or after  the sentence.  Sometimes there are no context clues.) What do you notice about the word? (In other words, is there a prefix, suffix, word ending, root word, capital letter, plural ending, etc?)  Look up the meaning of the word in a dictionary or online resource.
    8. Compare and contrast the setting of this story to the setting of the last story you read.
    9. Why is the setting important to the story?  Explain how the story would have changed, if the setting was different.
    10. What is the theme or central message of the story, how do you know?



    NONFICTION READING RESPONSE CHOICES:

    1. Why do you think the author wrote this selection?  How do you know?
    2. Were there any text features that helped you better understand your reading?  What were they and how did they help you?
    3. Write a timeline to show the order in which an event happened in the text.
    4. Write 3 things you learned, 2 things you still wonder about, and 1 thing you found surprising or challenged your thinking.
    5. Summarize your reading by answering the 5 W’s and H.  Who/What?  Where?  When? Why?  and How?
    6. Choose 3 or more interesting, unfamiliar, or important words from the selection you read. Copy the sentence with the word from the text.  What do you think the word means?  What were the context clues that helped you understand the meaning of the word (remember: context clues can come before the sentence, within the sentence, and/or after  the sentence.) Look up the meaning of the words in a dictionary or online resource.
    7. What was the main idea of what you read?  What were the supporting details that told you more about the main idea?
    8. What changed, challenged, or confirmed what you already knew about the topic?  Explain.
    9. Create a detailed illustration/diagram with labels and caption summarizing the most important / key points in the reading selection. (This can be a collage of words and pictures, or a DETAILED illustration, or any creative picture that proves you understood the informational text.)